Showing posts tagged with “nba”

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Brittney Griner Speaks The Truth

Brittney Griner recently became the WNBA’s #1 draft pick, and she also became the first openly gay athlete to sign with Nike. But after NBA star Jason Collins came out publicly and was heralded by many as the first “major out athlete,” Griner’s moment in the spotlight was, at least temporarily, eclipsed. In a powerful essay written for the Sunday New York Times, Brittney finally got the chance to share her story.

I adore her.

Love this woman!

Because [at least in America] you’re not considered an athlete unless you’re a man and play football, basketball, baseball and MAYBE hockey.  

*tears* Sic ‘em bears. 

I love Britt Griner

and yea notice how media outlets had to do a shitload of justifications to turn focus onto Jason Collins (not that his coming out wasn’t hugely important but there’s a double standard—people assume female athletes are lesbians anyway)

first…male…american…in a major sport…one of the big four

honeyspider:

theoriginalspike:

Carol of the Bells played with basketballs

…..THAT IS SO COOL.

THIS IS THE BEST.

(Source: flashesbef0reyoureyes)

heisjeremylin:

“My 5 year old Naim was devastated by the Knicks deciding NOT to match Jeremy Lin’s offer sheet from the Houston Rockets, the video reached many viewers and also reached Jeremy Lin. Jeremy was so touched by the original video that he decided to reach out to us and offer a skype virtual meet with Naim. Naim was so shy :) he made me do all the talking. Thanks again Jeremy hopefully we’ll see you at the bb game when we welcome you back to The Garden.”


“Still support the Knicks!” - Jeremy <— one awesome man!

SO CUTE THAT CHILD. Lol, literally in shock the whole time.

Jeremy is such a class act.

chicksdigthelongblog:

Final Farewell For Jeremy Lin
Sports are a business. It’s the unfortunate lesson we all must learn at sometime like finding out Santa isn’t real. It’s the only way to deal with the fact that players are treated not as people, but as assets and that, because of this, players will likely put money ahead of loyalty. As a kid, it’s an impossible concept to understand and now, as an adult, I still have trouble with it sometimes. We all have that moment when we realize professional sports aren’t the same as the leagues we played in as kids. For me the illusion was shattered in 2005 when the player I then hated most in the MLB, Johnny Damon, left the Boston Red Sox to join my rival New York Yankees. As a Yankee fan I didn’t care that Damon had batted .316 and finished 13th in MVP voting the year before. He had been a star for the Red Sox, therefore he wasn’t allowed to be on the Yankees. The revelation that teams and players treat professional sports as a business first and foremost didn’t ruin sports for me, but it certainly changed them.
For most young fans the illusion ends when a beloved player leaves to join another team. Sometimes the writings on the wall (hello Lebron), sometimes it’s not (hello Peyton Manning). Either way it’s devastating. For many young fans, the illusion was shattered on July 18 when the New York Knicks decided not to match the Houston Rocket’s offer sheet to Jeremy Lin. Not only was the writing not on the wall for this one, the marker hadn’t even been bought yet.
As a long time Knicks fan, I can’t say I was shocked by what happened (after all, I’m not even sure this ranks in the top 10 dumb moves made by Knicks management in my lifetime), but I was certainly surprised. Even Lin, in a rare moment of an athlete being honest and open, expressed how he believed he would always be a Knick in the end.
“Felton’s signing was the first time when I thought, ‘Oh, wow, I might not be a Knick,’” Lin said. Lin’s referring to the Knicks trading for Raymond Felton, a point guard who is more proven then Lin and averaged 17.1 points and 9.0 assists on the Knicks just two years earlier.
Arguing over whether Felton or Lin is the more logical choice for the Knicks is a pointless and futile debate. Lin has started 25 games, Felton just had the worst season of his career. Either one could struggle next year and no one would be shocked. I also don’t care much about the money aspect of the decision and am confused why fans keep bringing this up. Who cares how much money Lin brought into MSG and how it affects the stock market? Does this affect the fans somehow? Does this lower ticket prices? Will a beer still not cost me $8? 
What hurts most about the situation, and what Dolan seems to be overlooking, is how this move affects the fans of New York. What made the Jeremy Lin era (can an era be just 25 games?) so special was that not only did Jeremy Lin create the MSG atmosphere we’ve been waiting for, the MSG atmosphere created Jeremy Lin. No stage can motivate a player quite like the Garden.. Knicks fans, myself included, truly believe we brought Jeremy Lin to another level, a level he was only capable of reaching in New York. That’s not to say he won’t be a good player in Houston, but for him to drop 38 points on the Lakers in just his fourth career start? That felt like something bigger then just Jeremy Lin.
For a moment, Lin reminded us that not every aspect of basketball is business. So for all those kids out there that are devastated over Jeremy Lin, know that there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. With the Knicks, the tunnel’s been unusually long, but the light is as bright now as its been in a long time. Remember the good and let it give you optimism that one day we can get to that point again. 

chicksdigthelongblog:

Final Farewell For Jeremy Lin

Sports are a business. It’s the unfortunate lesson we all must learn at sometime like finding out Santa isn’t real. It’s the only way to deal with the fact that players are treated not as people, but as assets and that, because of this, players will likely put money ahead of loyalty. As a kid, it’s an impossible concept to understand and now, as an adult, I still have trouble with it sometimes. We all have that moment when we realize professional sports aren’t the same as the leagues we played in as kids. For me the illusion was shattered in 2005 when the player I then hated most in the MLB, Johnny Damon, left the Boston Red Sox to join my rival New York Yankees. As a Yankee fan I didn’t care that Damon had batted .316 and finished 13th in MVP voting the year before. He had been a star for the Red Sox, therefore he wasn’t allowed to be on the Yankees. The revelation that teams and players treat professional sports as a business first and foremost didn’t ruin sports for me, but it certainly changed them.

For most young fans the illusion ends when a beloved player leaves to join another team. Sometimes the writings on the wall (hello Lebron), sometimes it’s not (hello Peyton Manning). Either way it’s devastating. For many young fans, the illusion was shattered on July 18 when the New York Knicks decided not to match the Houston Rocket’s offer sheet to Jeremy Lin. Not only was the writing not on the wall for this one, the marker hadn’t even been bought yet.

As a long time Knicks fan, I can’t say I was shocked by what happened (after all, I’m not even sure this ranks in the top 10 dumb moves made by Knicks management in my lifetime), but I was certainly surprised. Even Lin, in a rare moment of an athlete being honest and open, expressed how he believed he would always be a Knick in the end.

“Felton’s signing was the first time when I thought, ‘Oh, wow, I might not be a Knick,’” Lin said. Lin’s referring to the Knicks trading for Raymond Felton, a point guard who is more proven then Lin and averaged 17.1 points and 9.0 assists on the Knicks just two years earlier.

Arguing over whether Felton or Lin is the more logical choice for the Knicks is a pointless and futile debate. Lin has started 25 games, Felton just had the worst season of his career. Either one could struggle next year and no one would be shocked. I also don’t care much about the money aspect of the decision and am confused why fans keep bringing this up. Who cares how much money Lin brought into MSG and how it affects the stock market? Does this affect the fans somehow? Does this lower ticket prices? Will a beer still not cost me $8? 

What hurts most about the situation, and what Dolan seems to be overlooking, is how this move affects the fans of New York. What made the Jeremy Lin era (can an era be just 25 games?) so special was that not only did Jeremy Lin create the MSG atmosphere we’ve been waiting for, the MSG atmosphere created Jeremy Lin. No stage can motivate a player quite like the Garden.. Knicks fans, myself included, truly believe we brought Jeremy Lin to another level, a level he was only capable of reaching in New York. That’s not to say he won’t be a good player in Houston, but for him to drop 38 points on the Lakers in just his fourth career start? That felt like something bigger then just Jeremy Lin.

For a moment, Lin reminded us that not every aspect of basketball is business. So for all those kids out there that are devastated over Jeremy Lin, know that there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. With the Knicks, the tunnel’s been unusually long, but the light is as bright now as its been in a long time. Remember the good and let it give you optimism that one day we can get to that point again. 

What I see from Jeremy and what I hear in his interviews is he appreciates everything. He pursues his dream. His attitude is so peaceful, but there is strength to him. It is not a violent strength like fire or something aggressive. It is like the ocean, very peaceful, very quiet when you look at it. But you can never underestimate the power that is in there.

Yao Ming (via myqwertymind)

"This awesome illustration is by artist Bernard Chang, who predicts "this will happen at least twice this upcoming season&#8230;"" - via angryasianman.

"This awesome illustration is by artist Bernard Chang, who predicts "this will happen at least twice this upcoming season…"" - via angryasianman.

That was the main reason I wanted him to come back. He is obviously a great player and was a huge part of my … our success this year, so seeing him leave hurts that much more. I also understand the Knicks were given a very difficult choice, so I understand that side. All that being said, I hope this is what is best for Jeremy, but I selfishly wanted him to be back with the Knicks.

-Steve Novak on Jeremy Lin’s departure.

Read more: http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/knicks/post/_/id/22306/steve-novak-anticipated-lin-back

(via heisjeremylin)

AND HERE COME THE TEARS. T____________T

Jeremy Lin is now a Rocket. Again.

This has been a post.

The Head-Scratching New York Knickerbockers

marinatedsports:

A week ago, it looked like the Knicks were poised to match any offer that restricted free agent Jeremy Lin would receive. After all, New York’s management had lost out in the Steve Nash sweepstakes and Jeremy Lin was the best Plan B available. The Knicks had sued the NBA for Lin’s “Bird” Rights in order to re-sign him even though it would push the team’s salary over the cap, and Marc Stein tweeted on July 5 that the Knicks were ready to “match any offer on Lin up to 1 billion dollars.” Lin led a dysfunctional and overpaid Knicks team to a 15-10 record in 25 starts, and many of these games were without Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire. He was a rare organic phenomenon in New York, and even though he still had some big holes in his game, the combination of playing in North America’s largest media market and being a productive Asian-American basketball player created a marketing goldmine.

The foregone conclusion that Jeremy Lin would remain a New York Knick was thrown out the window this weekend, when James Dolan’s front office executed a sign-and-trade that returned Raymond Felton to New York. Felton averaged 17 and 9 in 54 starts with the Knicks in the 2011 season before he was a part of the Carmelo Anthony trade, and it makes little sense to bring Jeremy Lin back to a roster that now includes both Felton and Jason Kidd. So when the Houston Rockets officially inked Lin to a three-year offer sheet worth $25.1 million over the weekend (with the final year of the contract paying a “poison pill” salary of $14.8 million), word started leaking out that the Knicks would not match. What happened?

Read More

"There are both reasons for New York to keep Lin and reasons why letting him go makes sense, but one completely inarguable fact is that the Knicks have handled this situation horribly."

Pretty much all of this. But again, the Knicks are notorious for making the worst decisions in its history. 

newimageworks:

Jeremy Lin signs three-year offer sheet with Houston Rockets
It’s your move, New York Knicks.
Jeremy Lin has signed a three-year offer sheet with the Houston Rockets, according to a source close to the talks. The deal is worth a little more than $25 million — $5 million in the first year, $5.225 million in the second year and $14.8 million in the third year. The Knicks have three days to match the Rockets’ offer.
Initial reports had the Rockets offering Lin a four-year deal for around $28 million. That deal included salaries of more than $9 million in each of the last two years, which would be a big hit on the Knicks’ cap. Still, the organization seemed intent on matching.
“They will match any offer on Lin up to $1 billion,” a source told ESPN.com’s Marc Stein last week.
It’s not clear, however, if the new deal changes that thinking since the third year of the current deal carries an even bigger cap hit.
Houston had a verbal agreement with Lin before the team emerged as a serious suitor for Dwight Howard. The Rockets will use the amnesty clause on forward Luis Scola, sources told ESPN.com’s Marc Stein, creating salary-cap space to take on bad contracts from the Orlando Magic. But the Lin offer sheet and an identical offer to Bulls center Omer Asik complicate the financial details of any trade with Orlando.
Lin, a restricted free agent, made $788,000 last season when he averaged 14.6 points, 6.2 assists and 3.1 rebounds in 35 games with 25 starts before his campaign was cut short because of surgery to repair torn cartilage in his knee.
But in the 35 games he was healthy, Lin went from an end-of-the-bench afterthought to an international phenomenon. The undrafted guard out of Harvard, who was cut twice in the preseason (once by the Rockets) and played in the D-League, set the league on fire in February, leading the Knicks to seven consecutive wins. He scored at least 20 points in nine of 10 games during that stretch.
(via Source — Jeremy Lin signs three-year offer sheet with Houston Rockets - ESPN New York)
Follow my blog for more comic, movie, music, sports, and entertainment news. 
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newimageworks:

Jeremy Lin signs three-year offer sheet with Houston Rockets

It’s your move, New York Knicks.

Jeremy Lin has signed a three-year offer sheet with the Houston Rockets, according to a source close to the talks. The deal is worth a little more than $25 million — $5 million in the first year, $5.225 million in the second year and $14.8 million in the third year. The Knicks have three days to match the Rockets’ offer.

Initial reports had the Rockets offering Lin a four-year deal for around $28 million. That deal included salaries of more than $9 million in each of the last two years, which would be a big hit on the Knicks’ cap. Still, the organization seemed intent on matching.

“They will match any offer on Lin up to $1 billion,” a source told ESPN.com’s Marc Stein last week.

It’s not clear, however, if the new deal changes that thinking since the third year of the current deal carries an even bigger cap hit.

Houston had a verbal agreement with Lin before the team emerged as a serious suitor for Dwight Howard. The Rockets will use the amnesty clause on forward Luis Scola, sources told ESPN.com’s Marc Stein, creating salary-cap space to take on bad contracts from the Orlando Magic. But the Lin offer sheet and an identical offer to Bulls center Omer Asik complicate the financial details of any trade with Orlando.

Lin, a restricted free agent, made $788,000 last season when he averaged 14.6 points, 6.2 assists and 3.1 rebounds in 35 games with 25 starts before his campaign was cut short because of surgery to repair torn cartilage in his knee.

But in the 35 games he was healthy, Lin went from an end-of-the-bench afterthought to an international phenomenon. The undrafted guard out of Harvard, who was cut twice in the preseason (once by the Rockets) and played in the D-League, set the league on fire in February, leading the Knicks to seven consecutive wins. He scored at least 20 points in nine of 10 games during that stretch.

(via Source — Jeremy Lin signs three-year offer sheet with Houston Rockets - ESPN New York)

Follow my blog for more comic, movie, music, sports, and entertainment news. 

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