Showing posts tagged with “new york knicks”

heisjeremylin:

“My 5 year old Naim was devastated by the Knicks deciding NOT to match Jeremy Lin’s offer sheet from the Houston Rockets, the video reached many viewers and also reached Jeremy Lin. Jeremy was so touched by the original video that he decided to reach out to us and offer a skype virtual meet with Naim. Naim was so shy :) he made me do all the talking. Thanks again Jeremy hopefully we’ll see you at the bb game when we welcome you back to The Garden.”


“Still support the Knicks!” - Jeremy <— one awesome man!

SO CUTE THAT CHILD. Lol, literally in shock the whole time.

Jeremy is such a class act.

chicksdigthelongblog:

Final Farewell For Jeremy Lin
Sports are a business. It’s the unfortunate lesson we all must learn at sometime like finding out Santa isn’t real. It’s the only way to deal with the fact that players are treated not as people, but as assets and that, because of this, players will likely put money ahead of loyalty. As a kid, it’s an impossible concept to understand and now, as an adult, I still have trouble with it sometimes. We all have that moment when we realize professional sports aren’t the same as the leagues we played in as kids. For me the illusion was shattered in 2005 when the player I then hated most in the MLB, Johnny Damon, left the Boston Red Sox to join my rival New York Yankees. As a Yankee fan I didn’t care that Damon had batted .316 and finished 13th in MVP voting the year before. He had been a star for the Red Sox, therefore he wasn’t allowed to be on the Yankees. The revelation that teams and players treat professional sports as a business first and foremost didn’t ruin sports for me, but it certainly changed them.
For most young fans the illusion ends when a beloved player leaves to join another team. Sometimes the writings on the wall (hello Lebron), sometimes it’s not (hello Peyton Manning). Either way it’s devastating. For many young fans, the illusion was shattered on July 18 when the New York Knicks decided not to match the Houston Rocket’s offer sheet to Jeremy Lin. Not only was the writing not on the wall for this one, the marker hadn’t even been bought yet.
As a long time Knicks fan, I can’t say I was shocked by what happened (after all, I’m not even sure this ranks in the top 10 dumb moves made by Knicks management in my lifetime), but I was certainly surprised. Even Lin, in a rare moment of an athlete being honest and open, expressed how he believed he would always be a Knick in the end.
“Felton’s signing was the first time when I thought, ‘Oh, wow, I might not be a Knick,’” Lin said. Lin’s referring to the Knicks trading for Raymond Felton, a point guard who is more proven then Lin and averaged 17.1 points and 9.0 assists on the Knicks just two years earlier.
Arguing over whether Felton or Lin is the more logical choice for the Knicks is a pointless and futile debate. Lin has started 25 games, Felton just had the worst season of his career. Either one could struggle next year and no one would be shocked. I also don’t care much about the money aspect of the decision and am confused why fans keep bringing this up. Who cares how much money Lin brought into MSG and how it affects the stock market? Does this affect the fans somehow? Does this lower ticket prices? Will a beer still not cost me $8? 
What hurts most about the situation, and what Dolan seems to be overlooking, is how this move affects the fans of New York. What made the Jeremy Lin era (can an era be just 25 games?) so special was that not only did Jeremy Lin create the MSG atmosphere we’ve been waiting for, the MSG atmosphere created Jeremy Lin. No stage can motivate a player quite like the Garden.. Knicks fans, myself included, truly believe we brought Jeremy Lin to another level, a level he was only capable of reaching in New York. That’s not to say he won’t be a good player in Houston, but for him to drop 38 points on the Lakers in just his fourth career start? That felt like something bigger then just Jeremy Lin.
For a moment, Lin reminded us that not every aspect of basketball is business. So for all those kids out there that are devastated over Jeremy Lin, know that there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. With the Knicks, the tunnel’s been unusually long, but the light is as bright now as its been in a long time. Remember the good and let it give you optimism that one day we can get to that point again. 

chicksdigthelongblog:

Final Farewell For Jeremy Lin

Sports are a business. It’s the unfortunate lesson we all must learn at sometime like finding out Santa isn’t real. It’s the only way to deal with the fact that players are treated not as people, but as assets and that, because of this, players will likely put money ahead of loyalty. As a kid, it’s an impossible concept to understand and now, as an adult, I still have trouble with it sometimes. We all have that moment when we realize professional sports aren’t the same as the leagues we played in as kids. For me the illusion was shattered in 2005 when the player I then hated most in the MLB, Johnny Damon, left the Boston Red Sox to join my rival New York Yankees. As a Yankee fan I didn’t care that Damon had batted .316 and finished 13th in MVP voting the year before. He had been a star for the Red Sox, therefore he wasn’t allowed to be on the Yankees. The revelation that teams and players treat professional sports as a business first and foremost didn’t ruin sports for me, but it certainly changed them.

For most young fans the illusion ends when a beloved player leaves to join another team. Sometimes the writings on the wall (hello Lebron), sometimes it’s not (hello Peyton Manning). Either way it’s devastating. For many young fans, the illusion was shattered on July 18 when the New York Knicks decided not to match the Houston Rocket’s offer sheet to Jeremy Lin. Not only was the writing not on the wall for this one, the marker hadn’t even been bought yet.

As a long time Knicks fan, I can’t say I was shocked by what happened (after all, I’m not even sure this ranks in the top 10 dumb moves made by Knicks management in my lifetime), but I was certainly surprised. Even Lin, in a rare moment of an athlete being honest and open, expressed how he believed he would always be a Knick in the end.

“Felton’s signing was the first time when I thought, ‘Oh, wow, I might not be a Knick,’” Lin said. Lin’s referring to the Knicks trading for Raymond Felton, a point guard who is more proven then Lin and averaged 17.1 points and 9.0 assists on the Knicks just two years earlier.

Arguing over whether Felton or Lin is the more logical choice for the Knicks is a pointless and futile debate. Lin has started 25 games, Felton just had the worst season of his career. Either one could struggle next year and no one would be shocked. I also don’t care much about the money aspect of the decision and am confused why fans keep bringing this up. Who cares how much money Lin brought into MSG and how it affects the stock market? Does this affect the fans somehow? Does this lower ticket prices? Will a beer still not cost me $8? 

What hurts most about the situation, and what Dolan seems to be overlooking, is how this move affects the fans of New York. What made the Jeremy Lin era (can an era be just 25 games?) so special was that not only did Jeremy Lin create the MSG atmosphere we’ve been waiting for, the MSG atmosphere created Jeremy Lin. No stage can motivate a player quite like the Garden.. Knicks fans, myself included, truly believe we brought Jeremy Lin to another level, a level he was only capable of reaching in New York. That’s not to say he won’t be a good player in Houston, but for him to drop 38 points on the Lakers in just his fourth career start? That felt like something bigger then just Jeremy Lin.

For a moment, Lin reminded us that not every aspect of basketball is business. So for all those kids out there that are devastated over Jeremy Lin, know that there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. With the Knicks, the tunnel’s been unusually long, but the light is as bright now as its been in a long time. Remember the good and let it give you optimism that one day we can get to that point again. 

"This awesome illustration is by artist Bernard Chang, who predicts "this will happen at least twice this upcoming season&#8230;"" - via angryasianman.

"This awesome illustration is by artist Bernard Chang, who predicts "this will happen at least twice this upcoming season…"" - via angryasianman.

Jon Wong.: The Jeremy Lin Debate No One Wants to Have By Devin Gordon The New...

jonwong:

The Jeremy Lin Debate No One Wants to Have

jeremy-lin-635.jpg


The New York Knicks letting Jeremy Lin walk out the door—for nothing—was the dumbest decision in the history of professional sports.

But let’s forget about that for a moment. The words “dumb” and “Knicks” are…

"I’m doing more mind-reading here with Dolan—never a safe proposition. But here’s what I am confident saying about Dolan on the subject of Lin’s ethnicity: he has absolutely no grasp of what Jeremy Lin really means as a cultural phenomenon. It does not pierce his bubble. It stirs no emotion in him. He doesn’t understand what it means for millions of people in this country, and around the world, to watch the first Asian-American superstar athlete excel on the highest stage, and what it means to have that player wearing the uniform of his team. The pride, the joy, the inspiration, the transformative effect it can have on an entire generation of kids.

That stuff is real. It only becomes hokey when people like me try to capture it with words on a page. If Dolan got that, he never would’ve let the Lin situation unravel over scratch money (to him, anyway) and petty animus. He would’ve sat the kid down, talked it out, buried the hatchet. And then he would’ve signed the deal.

Instead Dolan let him walk away. For nothing. Go ahead and call it stupid. Just don’t say that’s all it is.”

Last year, there were 259 NBA players who used more than 300 possessions. Of those players, Jason Kidd ranked 242nd in points per possession. That was four spots higher than his new teammate Raymond Felton. Lin ranked 192nd.

Jeremy Lin had a well-publicized turnover problem last season that became a talking point for every talking head who wanted to point out something bad about a player who had saved a dismal season, ignited interest in the NBA among millions of people worldwide, and dropped 38 against Kobe Bryant in the Garden. It’s true — of those same 259 players who used over 300 possessions, Lin ranked 252nd with a 21.4 turnover percentage. Raymond Felton ranked 244th at 19.6 percent. Jason Kidd? 257th at 24.2 percent. Guess who was 256th? Rajon Rondo. 258th? Steve Nash.

Dolan Blundered Again (via Grantland)

Also this stat:

(via heysportsblog)

The Head-Scratching New York Knickerbockers

marinatedsports:

A week ago, it looked like the Knicks were poised to match any offer that restricted free agent Jeremy Lin would receive. After all, New York’s management had lost out in the Steve Nash sweepstakes and Jeremy Lin was the best Plan B available. The Knicks had sued the NBA for Lin’s “Bird” Rights in order to re-sign him even though it would push the team’s salary over the cap, and Marc Stein tweeted on July 5 that the Knicks were ready to “match any offer on Lin up to 1 billion dollars.” Lin led a dysfunctional and overpaid Knicks team to a 15-10 record in 25 starts, and many of these games were without Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire. He was a rare organic phenomenon in New York, and even though he still had some big holes in his game, the combination of playing in North America’s largest media market and being a productive Asian-American basketball player created a marketing goldmine.

The foregone conclusion that Jeremy Lin would remain a New York Knick was thrown out the window this weekend, when James Dolan’s front office executed a sign-and-trade that returned Raymond Felton to New York. Felton averaged 17 and 9 in 54 starts with the Knicks in the 2011 season before he was a part of the Carmelo Anthony trade, and it makes little sense to bring Jeremy Lin back to a roster that now includes both Felton and Jason Kidd. So when the Houston Rockets officially inked Lin to a three-year offer sheet worth $25.1 million over the weekend (with the final year of the contract paying a “poison pill” salary of $14.8 million), word started leaking out that the Knicks would not match. What happened?

Read More

"There are both reasons for New York to keep Lin and reasons why letting him go makes sense, but one completely inarguable fact is that the Knicks have handled this situation horribly."

Pretty much all of this. But again, the Knicks are notorious for making the worst decisions in its history. 

I effing knew it.

eli-manning:

I said it weeks ago after Rubio tore his ACL that I was scared that this was going to happen to Jeremy and it did. 

Fuck you NBA. Shoving a regular season amount of games into a significantly shorter season. There have been injuries to a stupid amount of players all over the NBA and no one sees this as a problem!?

Shame on you, NBA. 

Noooooooo!!!! Stupid insane basketball schedule and evil players who’ve been making him bleed every other game ugh. Poor knee, poor baby, :(((((

Six whole weeks. Ugh, this doesn’t bode well for the team at all, they’re just barely hanging on to that eighth seed…

Awww love this picture.

Awww love this picture.

Currently 102-79!

I just tuned in to the fourth quarter of the game. Haven’t seen much, but man what I did see was just awesome. The passing has gotten so much more fluid. Lin with a double double. Epic fast breaks and alley oops and dunks.

It’s just, so beautiful. :D

now that was a great game to watch.

Team ball, chemistry, solid defense and offense, almost the whole team getting their minutes in. Looks like I have an east conference team to support.